We Need Another James Ulio

We could use another James A. Ulio in the midst of the COVID 19 crisis. We desperately need someone to fix the current logistical mess in supplying medical supplies to hospitals and health care workers — someone like Major General James A. Ulio. 

Ulio faced the task of building an Army large enough to fight wars in Europe, North Africa and the Pacific. Through his efforts, the Army increased in size from around 200,000 soldiers to eight million—in less than five years. He advocated and navigated around lowering the draft age to eighteen. He led and oversaw training efforts that quickly and efficiently prepared soldiers. The general correctly projected that those methods would be a positive outcome of the war. His team identified the appropriate allocation for incoming troops. In order to field sufficient troops to ensure an Allied victory, Ulio had to address and challenge commonly held beliefs on race and gender. It was his order in 1944 that ended segregation on military transportation and in recreational facilities on Army posts.

Thankfully, Alan Mesches has written an excellent biography of General Ulio. Alan’s book reveals Ulio’s unrecognized contributions to the war effort.  This biography should be on every World War II student’s bookcase.

For more information and to order a copy,  please see  Major General James A. Ulio 

 

About Allen Mesch

Allen is an author, educator, and historian. He has written five books: The Analyst; Teacher of Civil War Generals; Your Affectionate Father, Charles F. Smith; Charles A. Marvin - "One Year. Six Months, and Eleven Days", and Preparing for Disunion. Allen's latest book, Ebenezer Allen - Statesman, Entrepreneur, and Spy is scheduled for release in August 2020. He teaches classes on the American Civil War at Collin College. He has visited more than 130 Civil War sites and shares his over 4,000 photographs on Civil-War-Journeys.org. He blogs about the Civil War on Salient Points.
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